JungHee Kang , MPH, BSN, RN »


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JungHee Kang , MPH, BSN, RN

University of Kentucky PhD
Home Lexington KY United States

Biography

JungHee Kang is a doctoratal student in the BSN-to-PhD program at University of Kentucky College of Nursing. Prior to her current studies, she obtained a master’s degree in public health focused on biostatistics at the University of Kentucky and a bachelor’s degree in nursing science at the University of Texas Medical Branch. Her research is focused on interactions among inflammatory mediators, nutrition and cardiovascular disease. She has a particular interest in developing nutrition-related and life-style interventions in patients with CVD (e.g. heart failure) to improve health outcomes, such as frequency of re-hospitalization, the duration of hospitalization, improving the ability of self-management and survival, and enhancing quality of life. She was involved in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)-funded project designed to test the efficacy of a heart health intervention delivered to rural Appalachians. She is currently involved in two National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)-funded projects: 1) to reduce heart disease risk factors for caregivers of patients with chronic illnesses in rural Kentucky and 2) to improve adherence to the low sodium diet and to decrease symptoms in heart failure patients and their family caregivers.

Notes

Research/Clinical Practice Area: Jonas Nurse Leader – Other
Dissertation: The effect of diet in the relationship between chronic stress and levels of oxidative stress and inflammation in patients with metabolic syndrome:
Individuals diagnosed with metabolic syndrome are at a two-fold risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recently, the positive association between chronic stress and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome has been reported. Chronic stress is associated with the levels of oxidative stress and inflammation that lead to an increased incidence of CVD and mortality. Chronic stress can trigger risky health behaviors, such as poor diet. Inflammation and oxidative stress responsible for the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome and CVD can be modulated by diet. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of diet in the relationship between chronic stress and the levels of oxidative stress and inflammation in patients with metabolic syndrome. The results of this study will provide insight into how diet quality is involved in chronic-stress-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and outline potential diet interventions for those who have high levels of chronic stress with metabolic syndrome.