MJ Tran »


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MJ Tran

Home South Jordan UT United States

Biography

MJ Tran, MBA, BSN is a PhD student at the University of Utah College of Nursing. She has over nine years of experience in healthcare innovation, care management and transitions of care across the lifespan. In her current role, she envisioned a robust community-based Transitional Care Management program that reduced re-hospitalization rates by 50% by establishing communication links in healthcare settings that did not previously exist. Ms. Tran’s overarching goal is to improve patient outcomes, quality and cost-effectiveness of care for older adults and veterans with multifaceted conditions. Her dissertation will explore the role of payer standard authorization protocols on inappropriate skilled nursing facility admission denials for older adults and veterans transitioning from the home setting to a higher level of care. Due to lack of caregivers, social and supportive care limitations, as well as high-risk complications, this growing population continues to face vulnerability in seeking adequate quality of life and care. This project aims to avoid costly hospitalizations by identifying lower cost and appropriate solutions for vulnerable populations with multimorbidity. Ms. Tran completed her BS in Biology from Utah State University, her BSN from Creighton University, an MBA from Westminster College, and is the recipient of the 2017 Utah Healthcare Hero Award for Community Outreach. She is a firm believer that there should be no trade secrets in healthcare and advocates to challenge the status quo of standardized care. In working collaboratively rather than as individuals, the healthcare community can be rebuilt to empower the most vulnerable populations.

Notes

Research/Clinical Practice Area: Jonas Veterans Healthcare Scholar – Community-based Care
Dissertation: Exploring the Impact of Post-Acute Admission Denials by Medicare Advantage Payers for Homebound Older Adults and Veterans with Multimorbidity In transitioning homebound older adults with physical and psychiatric disorders to a higher level of care, many barriers were discovered in the standard authorization guidelines for Medicare Advantage payers. These barriers resulted in care delays, denials, increase in hospitalizations and readmission, diminished qualify of life, as well as fatalities. The purpose of this dissertation is to explore the long-term impacts on patient outcomes and costs to the healthcare systems due to standardized protocols. The overarching goal of this dissertation is to bridge a care model focused on maximizing comfort and minimizing costs by identifying levels of care suitable for optimal outcomes.





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