Yu Jin Kang , MPH, BSN, RN »


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Photo of Yu Jin Kang , MPH, BSN, RN

Yu Jin Kang , MPH, BSN, RN

University of Minnesota PhD
Home Eden Prairie MN United States

Biography

Yu Jin Kang is a third-year Ph.D. student specializing in Informatics, Gerontology, and Nursing management in the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota (UMN), Twin Cities. As a registered nurse, she also has provided a nursing care to residents in the long-term care (LTC) facilities. She has an interest in the nursing experience and the resident care in LTC setting, with a specific intent to pursue the understanding of nursing interventions for the resident with multiple chronic conditions. Specifically, with time and motion study and interview data, she plans to build a research platform for effective chronic condition interventions. The pilot study for her dissertation project was awarded the Myrtle Kitchell-Aydelotte Leadership Grant from the UMN School of Nursing. Prior to her current studies, she received a master’s degree in health policy and management from the Emory University and a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the Seoul National University. After her Ph.D. studies, Yu Jin will seek for academic faculty positions to become an academic nurse educator, who navigates and facilitates student learning experiences as well as translates nursing knowledge into the clinical practices and related policies.

Notes

Research/Clinical Practice Area: Jonas Scholar – Chronic Health
Dissertation: Understanding nursing interventions for long-term care residents with chronic conditions: Time and motion study There is increasing demand for long-term care (LTC) services for older adults with multiple chronic conditions. Nurses in LTC settings are ideally positioned to address multiple chronic conditions through comprehensive, holistic nursing interventions. However, many LTC nurses face critical shortages of time and resources that may limit intervention effectiveness. Therefore, it is critical to understand the specific nursing interventions received by LTC residents with multiple chronic conditions in real life LTC settings. To achieve this, my dissertation study will quantitatively investigate LTC nurse interventions using a Time and motion study (TMS) conducted with a web-based time recording tool, TimeCaT™, and a standardized description of LTC nursing interventions, the Omaha System. I will also qualitatively explore their attitudes, practices, and views. Using the TimeCaT and interview data obtained from the study, I will build a research platform for effective chronic condition interventions that will enable LTC nurses and the interprofessional health care team to understand challenges that exist in LTC, proactively redesign staff education and training, develop novel/tailored interventions for chronic health conditions, and ultimately improve the quality of life and self-management skills outcomes for residents with multiple chronic conditions.





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